Mom + Friends: Meet Amy Mignon Webb, A Super Cool, Inspirational Mama + Special Needs Family Lifestyle Blogger.

Name: Amy Mignon Webb aka Miggy of This Little Miggy Stayed Home

5 words that describe your "job":  Mother, Writer, Artist, Advocate, Flexible

Your Kids names and ages: I use only pseudonyms online so my oldest is known as PSP and is age 10, Lamp is my 7-year-old and Zuzu is my 3 year old. Three rad girls.

How do your children inspire you? I am constantly amazed at these bright and confident girls I am raising. My oldest is a walking encyclopedia and has a true love of learning. She is also adventurous, kind, funny and has the coolest head under pressure. She is the ideal big sister. 

My middle daughter Lamp certainly inspires me in terms of her disability, but probably not in the way most people think. She is not "overcoming her disability" she is just being herself. And by being herself she has taught me a lot about human possibility. But even more importantly, she lives with the most open, vulnerable heart and that is probably what inspires me the most about her. 

My youngest daughter inspires me to be present. I'm holding on fast to these fleeting days of childhood and it's taken me a while to try and embrace the moments as they come. 

What’s the one thing you wish people knew about your special needs child? I want people to know that what she lacks in limbs, she makes up for in personality--ha! She is more alike than different and please don't ever count her out. When we started out on this special needs journey we saw a beautiful baby girl who we loved so very much, but we also saw limitations and disability. Over the years she has taught me a lot about human POSSibility. Yes, she has restrictions and there are some things she can't do, but because of that she also has developed talents and abilities I didn't think possible. She writes with her feet, she plays the piano, she was on her local cheerleading squad in kindergarten! She sees possibility in everything and she has taught me to look for possibility as well. Sometimes we have to be innovative to help her be independent and included, but more often than not, she can participate, be included and keep up. 

"When we started out on this special needs journey we saw a beautiful baby girl who we loved so very much, but we also saw limitations and disability. Over the years she has taught me a lot about human POSSibility."

My overall desire is that people see my daughter as a whole, multifaceted, wonderful, complicated, beautiful human being that can't be distilled to just one thing. When my daughter was little people often commented with genuine surprise at how happy she was. It happened too often to be a coincidence. "Wow. She's so happy isn't she?" or "I can't believe how happy she is..." and the unintentional message was that many people thought of disability and happiness as incompatible. They're not. Disability isn't inherently sad, wrong, or even undesirable. I'm not saying it will never be hard or difficult--it can be. But it is also a very normal part of life and something the vast majority of us will face at some point. And it's OK. Being disabled, is OK. 

How do you survive a tough day of parenting? Chocolate, music and Netflix. I'm definitely one who needs an escape and those are three of my favorites. 

What is an activity your whole family loves to do together? We love family movie nights, traveling, and going on lots of outings around town--the zoo, fun parks, and playgrounds. 

What is the one thing in your play space your children can't live without? Our bounce house! We bought a small one for our 3-year-old's birthday last year and that thing has been a lifesaver! We keep it in our (unfinished) basement and the kids can have some fun, active play year round. Sure, it's a bit of a monstrosity but I don't know how we got along without it! If you have space, I highly recommend it. 

What's the one thing you can't leave the house without when you are out with your kids? Water. My husband sorta hates this as he wasn't raised with a mom who brought a water bottle with her wherever she went, but it's true. We can't go anywhere without some water.

"Disability isn't inherently sad, wrong, or even undesirable. I'm not saying it will never be hard or difficult--it can be. But it is also a very normal part of life and something the vast majority of us will face at some point. And it's OK. Being disabled, is OK." 

Their favorite toys? The aforementioned bounce house.

Their favorite app? PBS Kids

The clothing item your children always feel most comfortable in? Being a girl family we absolutely love Alice and Ames dresses for nearly every occasion. 

Three Moms you follow on social media that inspire you and why?

Alison Faulkner You know at first I thought she was just a fun loving gal who was funny and liked to have a good time, but girfriend is deep! There is a method to her madness and she inspires me to want to take more risks and get out there with my message. 

Kendra Smoot She inspires me to deliberately and unapologetically seek for beauty in my everyday life.

Rebekah Taussig is not a mom but she has been a mentor to me in terms of better understanding disability, accessibility and the world around me. She is brilliant. 

What is the last thing you purchased for yourself that made you really happy? My Bryr Clogs. I live in them. 

What advice would you give to a (new) special needs mom? I would tell her, "It's going to be OK. Most likely, more than OK. Most likely, amazing. Because here's the deal--every single human being is a gamble and we love them anyway. Millions of parents have had an ultrasound appointment where everything came back positive and normal, and they went on to have these "healthy" children who grew up to be drug dealers, belligerent teenagers, liars, cheaters or just incredibly, terribly average people. And guess what? They love them anyway. When you think about the time you spent dating and choosing your mate it seems almost insane that we then go on to invite tiny humans into our lives where we get absolutely no say in who these little people are. We get no say in their personality, likes, dislikes, abilities, or disabilities. And we love them anyway. Every single human is a gamble and we love them anyway. People with disabilities are no different. I promise that you will love them anyway." 

Also, always trust your gut! You know your kiddo better than any doctor or specialist--trust your gut.

"When you think about the time you spent dating and choosing your mate it seems almost insane that we then go on to invite tiny humans into our lives where we get absolutely no say in who these little people are. We get no say in their personality, likes, dislikes, abilities, or disabilities. And we love them anyway. Every single human is a gamble and we love them anyway. People with disabilities are no different. I promise that you will love them anyway."

What quote do you live by? I'm not sure that I have a quote that I live by, but a few years ago this one became very meaningful to me:

"And now that you don't have to be perfect, you can be good." --John Steinbeck

Learn More About Amy And Her This Little Miggy Stayed Home Lifestyle Blog Here. And Follow her on Instagram!